SUPPORTED BY 18-270MM

PROFILE

Tetsuro Shimizu

Tetsuro Shimizu

Born in 1975 Yokohama-City, Japan. After graduation from Nippon Photography Institute, he worked as an assistant to Scenery Photographer - Toshinobu Takeuchi for 3 years.At the age of 23, he became a freelance photographer and has been taking wide variety of photography from nature to personal documentary. In 2005, he was awarded the First Yonosuke Natori Award for his artwork named "Rojo Shonen (Road Teenage Boy)". He has also held many solo exhibitions over the years. Member of Japan Professional Photographers Society.

GALLERY

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Bird

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MESSAGE

Bearing the inauspicious image of a bird that flocks around decaying flesh, the crow is an unpopular bird in Japan. However, both Nihon Shoki, Japan's oldest official history, and the Kojiki, its oldest history book, contain the story of the Yatagarasu, a legendary three-legged crow which was said to be a manifestation of the Sun. Even today, there are Shinto shrines at which this crow is worshiped as a god. In areas throughout the world, there are legends linking crows with the Sun. In the parable about Noah's Ark in the Bible's Old Testament, there is the famous story about a dove that was released and brought back an olive branch, and that is how the people on the ark knew that land was near. However, it is also said that a crow had also been released before the dove, but the crow did not return to the ark. Some say that is because the crow was thought to be a bird that served the sun god Apollo, and therefore, it returned to a black spot on the Sun. Others say that, because the crow is highly intelligent, it was able to find a sanctuary in a safe place and ended up living there.

Unfortunately, no one in Tokyo thinks of the crow as a manifestation of the Sun. In this concrete jungle where the crow has no natural enemies, its aggressive strength causes it to be viewed as an offensive bully by the people of today, many of whom are very sensitive. Viewed exclusively in a negative light, crows have even been subject to large-scale eradication programs. I believe that we need to set aside our prejudices and learn more about the crow and its appealing characteristics. It has excellent powers of observation and insight, and its feats of strength and ability to utilize small branches for various purposes are both beautiful and intellectually impressive. When I see crows facing difficult problems and accidents that befall them in the huge city of Tokyo, considering how to overcome them from a variety of angles, and then calmly taking action, I cannot help but to think that they may be far more superior to other types of birds. Seeing the crow shifting back and forth between desperate and comfortable aspects that exist in daily life, I feel it must indeed be a manifestation of the Sun. This is the reason for my selecting for this project these works, which I finished in a film-photography style. Nothing would make me happier if, through these photographs, the viewers are able to imagine the crow as being the Sun's manifestation.

Feedback on having used 18-270mm (Model B008)

Shooting the "BIRD" series in the streets, it was critical for me to have a lens that is compact and lightweight for good portability and easy handheld shooting, quiet and smooth in operation, and comes with a reliable autofocus function. With all of that plus a VC (Vibration Compensation) function, I believe this is truly the ideal lens.

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